Robbery, burglary, and theft are three terms that are commonly used to describe crimes involving property, and they are often used interchangeably. In truth, each of these crimes is distinct from one another and a person must commit certain actions in order to be charged with that offense.

Robbery / Burglary / Trespass

Robbery is a theft offense that often involves some kind of personal interaction. Burglary, on the other hand, usually involves an alleged offender illegally entering property to commit a criminal offense. A trespass violation can also result from unauthorized entry on to certain property.  

Robbery / Burglary / Trespass Defense Attorneys in Columbus, OH | Sabol | Mallory

Were you or your loved arrested for an alleged robbery, burglary, or trespass crime in the Columbus area? Make sure that you contact Sabol | Mallory right away.

Our firm will work tirelessly to possibly get your criminal charges reduced or dismissed. We can examine your case when you call (614) 300-5088 or contact us online to receive a free consultation.

Robbery Penalties in Ohio

Ohio Revised Code § 2911.02 establishes that a person commits robbery if they either have a deadly weapon on or about their person or under their control, inflict, attempt to inflict, or threaten to inflict physical harm on another person, or use or threaten the immediate use of force against another person while attempting or committing a theft offense or in fleeing immediately after the attempt or offense. A robbery involving the use or threatened immediate use of force against another person is a third-degree felony punishable by nine months to five years in prison and/or fine of up to $10,000, but a robbery involving an alleged offender having a deadly weapon on or about their person or under their control or the infliction, attempt to inflict, or threat to inflict physical harm on another person is a second-degree felony punishable by two to eight years in prison and/or fine of up to $15,000.

Under Ohio Revised Code § 2911.01(A), a person commits aggravated robbery when they do any of the following in attempting or committing a theft offense or in fleeing immediately after the attempt or offense:

  • Have a deadly weapon on or about the offender's person or under the offender's control and either display the weapon, brandish it, indicate that the offender possesses it, or use it;

  • Have a dangerous ordnance on or about the offender's person or under the offender's control;

  • Inflict, or attempt to inflict, serious physical harm on another.

Ohio Revised Code § 2911.01(B) further establishes that a person cannot knowingly remove or attempt to remove a deadly weapon from the person of a law enforcement officer, or shall knowingly deprive or attempt to deprive a law enforcement officer of a deadly weapon, when the officer is acting within the course and scope of their duties and the alleged offender knows or has reasonable cause to know that the officer is a law enforcement officer. Aggravated robbery is a first-degree felony punishable by three to 11 years in prison and/or fine of up to $20,000.

Burglary Penalties in Ohio

Under Ohio Revised Code § 2911.12, a person commits burglary if they by force, stealth, or deception, trespass in an occupied structure or in a separately secured or separately occupied portion of an occupied structure, when another person other than an accomplice of the alleged offender is present, with purpose to commit in the structure or in the separately secured or separately occupied portion of the structure any criminal offense, or trespass in an occupied structure or in a separately secured or separately occupied portion of an occupied structure that is a permanent or temporary habitation of any person when any person other than an accomplice of the alleged offender is present or likely to be present, with purpose to commit in the habitation any criminal offense. Either of these violations is a second-degree felony punishable by two to eight years in prison and/or fine of up to $15,000.

A person also commits burglary if they by force, stealth, or deception, trespass in an occupied structure or in a separately secured or separately occupied portion of an occupied structure, with purpose to commit in the structure or separately secured or separately occupied portion of the structure any criminal offense. This violation is a third-degree felony punishable by nine months to five years in prison and/or fine of up to $10,000.

Ohio Revised Code § 2911.11 establishes that a person commits the crime of aggravated burglary if they by force, stealth, or deception, trespass in an occupied structure or in a separately secured or separately occupied portion of an occupied structure, when another person other than an accomplice of the alleged offender is present, with purpose to commit in the structure or in the separately secured or separately occupied portion of the structure any criminal offense, and the alleged offender inflicts, or attempts or threatens to inflict physical harm on another person or the alleged offender has a deadly weapon or dangerous ordnance on or about the offender's person or under their control. Aggravated burglary is a first-degree felony punishable by three to 11 years in prison and/or fine of up to $20,000.

Trespass Penalties in Ohio

Under Ohio Revised Code § 2911.21, a person commits criminal trespass when they, without privilege to do so, do any of the following:

  • Knowingly enter or remain on the land or premises of another;

  • Knowingly enter or remain on the land or premises of another, the use of which is lawfully restricted to certain persons, purposes, modes, or hours, when the offender knows the offender is in violation of any such restriction or is reckless in that regard;

  • Recklessly enter or remain on the land or premises of another, as to which notice against unauthorized access or presence is given by actual communication to the offender, or in a manner prescribed by law, or by posting in a manner reasonably calculated to come to the attention of potential intruders, or by fencing or other enclosure manifestly designed to restrict access;

  • Being on the land or premises of another, negligently fail or refuse to leave upon being notified by signage posted in a conspicuous place or otherwise being notified to do so by the owner or occupant, or the agent or servant of either.

Criminal trespass is a fourth-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in jail and/or fine of up to $250. A violation involving the use of a snowmobile, off-highway motorcycle, or all-purpose vehicle can result in a fine of up to $500, and people with two or more prior convictions for trespass involving a snowmobile, off-highway motorcycle, or all-purpose vehicle can have their vehicles impounded.

When a person enters or remains on the land or premises of another party with purpose to commit on that land or those premises a misdemeanor causing physical harm to another person or causing another person to believe that the offender will cause physical harm to them, they commit the crime of aggravated trespass under Ohio Revised Code § 2911.211. Aggravated trespass is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 days in jail and/or fine of up to $1,000.

Columbus, OH Robbery / Burglary / Trespass Resources

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost | Apply for Victims Compensation — Victims of violent crimes or financial crimes can apply for financial assistance through this website. People eligible for payments include victims injured as the result of violent crimes, dependents of homicide victims, and claimants responsible for crime victims’ expenses, such as parents or guardians. Payments may cover medical bills, lost wages, and many other expenses.

Central Ohio Crimes Stoppers — The Crime Stoppers program allows people to submit anonymous tips related to certain crimes. The organization averages $35,000 in awards annually and has an 85 percent success rate in apprehending wanted fugitives. Learn about the crime of the week and view a list of wanted suspects.

Robbery and Property Crime | The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC) —  The NCVC identifies itself as “the nation's leading resource and advocacy organization for crime victims and those who serve them.” Learn about ways to get help for yourself as well as help for others after a robbery. You can also download a Teen Action Toolkit: Building a Youth-led Response to Teen Victimization.

Contact a Columbus Robbery / Burglary / Trespass Defense Lawyer Today

If you or your loved were arrested for an alleged robbery, burglary, or trespass offense in the greater Columbus area, do not wait to seek legal representation. You will want to have an experienced criminal defense attorney involved as soon as possible.

Sabol | Mallory has more than 20 years of combined experience defending people all over Ohio. Call (614) 300-5088 or contact us online to take advantage of a free consultation.

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